Quote of the Day — Mark Twain

“If you don’t read the newspaper, you’re uninformed. If you read the newspaper, you’re misinformed.”

Quote of the Day — William F. Buckley

“I’m not going to insult your intelligence by suggesting that you believe what you just said.”

Thought of the Day

The first rule of pessimism: it can always get worse.

Quote of the day — Charles H. Spurgeon

“Of two evils, choose neither.”

What is a “post turtle”?

A “post turtle” is a turtle resting atop a fence post. The turtle didn’t get up there by himself, he doesn’t belong there, he can’t get anything done while he’s up there and you just want to help the poor, dumb thing down.

Kind of describes our current president, doesn’t it?

Quote of the Day — Mike Rowe

“Just because you love something doesn’t mean you can’t suck at it.”

Source: The Four Hour Workweek

Quote of the Day — Thomas Sowell

“One of the problems with being a pessimist is that you can never celebrate when you are proven right.”

From: Townhall

Quote of the Day

“True optimist: A blind man who enters a dark room looking for a black cat that he knows isn’t there.”

More performance evaluations

  1. “Since my last report, this employee has reached rock bottom and has started to dig.”
  2. “His men would follow him anywhere, but only out of morbid curiosity.”
  3. “I would not allow this employee to breed.”
  4. “This employee is really not so much of a has-been, but more of a definite won’t-be.”
  5. “Works well when under constant supervision and cornered like a rat in a trap.”
  6. “When she opens her mouth, it seems that it is only to change feet.”
  7. “He would be out of his depth in a parking lot puddle.”
  8. “This young lady has delusions of adequacy.”
  9. “He sets low personal standards and then consistently fails to achieve them.”
  10. “This employee is depriving a village somewhere of an idiot.”
  11. “This employee should go far, and the sooner he starts, the better.”
  12. “Got a full 6-pack, but lacks the plastic thing to hold it all together.”
  13. “A gross ignoramus – 144 times worse than an ordinary ignoramus.”
  14. “He certainly takes a long time to make his pointless.”
  15. “He doesn’t have ulcers, but he’s a carrier.”
  16. “I would like to go hunting with him sometime.”
  17. “He’s been working with glue too much.”
  18. “He would argue with a signpost.”
  19. “He has a knack for making strangers immediately.”
  20. “He brings a lot of joy whenever he leaves the room.”
  21. “When his IQ reaches 50, he should sell.”
  22. “If you see two people talking and one looks bored, he’s the other one.”
  23. “He has a photographic memory with the lens cap glued on.”
  24. “A prime candidate for natural deselection.”
  25. “Donated his brain to science before he was done using it.”
  26. “Gates are down, the lights are flashing, but the train isn’t coming.”
  27. “Has two brains cells: one is lost and the other is out looking for it”
  28. “If he were any more stupid, he’d have to be watered twice a week.”
  29. “If you give him a penny for his thoughts, you’d get change.”
  30. “If you stand close enough to him, you can hear the oceans.”
  31. “It’s hard to believe that he beat out 1,000,000 other sperm.”
  32. “One neuron short of a synapse.”
  33. “Some drank from the fountain of knowledge; he only gargled.”
  34. “Takes him 2 hours to watch 60 minutes.”
  35. “The wheel is turning, but the hamster is dead.”

Quote of the Day — Dr. Ben Carson

“I believe I came from God, and you believe you came from a monkey, and you’ve convinced me you’re right.”

Quote of the Day — Abraham Lincoln

“We must not promise what we ought not, lest we be called on to perform what we cannot.”

Quote of the Day — Seth Godin

“The long run is always shorter than we imagine.”

From: Seth’s Blog

Quote of the Day — Ray Bradbury

“Insanity is relative. It depends on who has who locked in what cage.”

From: Crossderry Blog

Quote of the Day — Peter Drucker

“Nothing is less productive than to make more efficient what should not be done at all.”

Arnold Ahlert: Who speaks for us?

If there’s one thing the current election cycle has made clear, it’s the reality that millions of Americans feel utterly disenfranchised. Their anger and frustration are driven by the daunting realization that neither political party represents their interests. This despicable status quo begs the simplest question, one every candidate running for elective office in 2016 should be forced to answer: Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where there is a clear understanding of right and wrong, not one dominated by the “anything goes” cultural sewage churned out on a regular basis by Hollywood and the mainstream media. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation that puts Americans first — one with definable, enforceable borders and one where Rule of Law is paramount — not one that gratifies the desires of millions of illegals and their cadre of elitist supporters aiming to fundamentally transform our national character, using cheap votes and cheap labor to do so. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where we no longer cater to the lowest common denominator of human behavior to accommodate “root causes,” the “soft bigotry of low expectations,” or a multiculturalist mishmash that excuses misogyny, anti-Semitism, and racism under the rubric of “celebrating our differences.” Who speaks for us?

We want to live a nation with an educational system that teaches children how to think, not what to think. A system where ideological indoctrination social promotion, grade inflation, worthless diplomas, “creative” math, and the generalized dumbing-down of vulnerable children is tossed on the ash heap of history. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where merit and excellence matter, not one where millions of “snowflakes” have been cushioned by trigger warnings, micro-aggressions, speech codes and helicopter parents who believe everyone should get a trophy just for showing up. A nation where the content of one’s character is far more important than the color of one’s skin, one’s gender, one’s sexual orientation, or one’s membership in a particular grievance group. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where the Constitution is defended for what it actually says, not what some people would like it to mean because a “living” interpretation of the document accommodates their agenda, political correctness or the latest trend. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where we don’t burden our children and grandchildren with unconscionable levels of debt that will destroy their standard of living, one where able-bodied people are expected to work for a living, and one where the free-market capitalism that rewards ambition, risk-taking and talent isn’t subsumed by a government-controlled crony-capitalist oligarchy that stifles competition and picks winners and losers. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation with the strongest military in the world, not one debased by social engineering. A military that only sends men and women into harm’s way when our national security is threatened, and one that utterly rejects such nonsense as “winning hearts and minds,” restrictive and dangerous Rules of Engagement, and politically correct warfare that elevates concerns for collateral damage above the lives of American soldiers. A military with only one objective in mind when it becomes necessary to put the nation’s blood and treasure at risk: unambiguous victory. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where states’ rights are once again paramount, where 50 separate constituencies would be given maximum freedom to innovate, to compete, and do anything else to improve the lives of their citizens without the interfering heavy hand of the District of Columbia. A nation where people intuitively understand government operates best from the local level outwards, not the federal level inward. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where we treat our allies like the friends they are, and our enemies with the suspicion they have earned. A nation where foreign policy is grounded in reality, not faculty-lounge-inspired wishful thinking. A nation that will no longer send foreign aid to people who hate us, based on the dubious assertion we can buy their loyalty and admiration. Who speaks for us?

We want to live in a nation where we celebrate our exceptionalism, not identify only by our shortcomings. Those who insist otherwise should be asked to explain why people all over the world are beating a path to our shores. Who speaks for us?

As the opening of the Constitution states, “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity…”

“We the people” is us, not a bunch of self-interested politicians and their well connected benefactors. A “more perfect” union is an aspiration. We must not allow our pursuit of that perfection to be the enemy of our goodness. Same goes for establishing justice and insuring domestic tranquility.

As for the next two items, it’s important to note the critical distinction between providing for the commence defense and promoting the general welfare. It is the government’s constitutionally mandated duty to provide protection for the nation. It is not the government’s duty to provide for the peoples’ welfare, but rather to promote the conditions that allow a free people to provide for their own welfare, that of their families and those Americans who are truly in need.

As for the blessings of Liberty, the implication is clear: There is a higher power from which those blessings are secured and it does not emanate from Washington, state legislatures or local governments. As Thomas Jefferson so eloquently explained in the Declaration of Independence, all men are “endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights.” There are millions of Americans who cherish that wisdom, even as they still understand it is the ultimate foundation of the greatest nation ever devised by man.

Who speaks for us?

From: Patriot Post

Quote of the Day

“You don’t need to be motivated all the time…just at the right time.”

Thought of the Day — George Pólya

Examine your guess. Your guess may be right, but it is foolish to accept a vivid guess as a proven truth — as primitive people often do. Your guess may be wrong. But it is also foolish to disregard a vivid guess altogether — as pedantic people sometimes do. Guesses of a certain kind deserve to be examined and taken seriously: those which occur to us after we have attentively considered and really understood a problem in which we are genuinely interested. Such guesses usually contain at least a fragment of the truth although, of course, they very seldom show the whole truth. Yet there is a chance to extract the whole truth if we examine such a guess appropriately.

Many a guess has turned out to be wrong but nevertheless useful in leading to a better one.

No idea is really bad, unless we are uncritical. What is really bad is to have no idea at all.

From: Observational Epidemiology

Quote of the Day — John Maynard Keynes

“When the facts change, I change my mind. What do you do, sir?”

Quote of the Day — Steve Howell

“Nothing exists except atoms and empty space; everything else is opinion.”

From: Leica Birding Blog

Quote of the Day — Richard Feynman

“It doesn’t matter how beautiful your theory is, it doesn’t matter how smart you are. If it doesn’t agree with experiment, it’s wrong.”